Design Technology

Design and Technology at Portland 
 

At Portland Primary School teachers ensure that children are given many opportunities to use their creativity and imagination to design and make products throughout each key stage. We extend their opportunities, by making use of the technology available to us at the local City Learning Centres. Our curriculum has been adapted to meet the new expectations of the National Curriculum. To capture children’s imagination and maximise cross curricular learning, our projects are mapped to the topics taught.  Literacy and numeracy skills are extended, as is our use of new technology and computing. 

We are fortunate enough to be able to grow some of our own food in our garden, and a cooking club extends the cooking and nutrition learning in class. We make use of external expertise, In the form of chefs, design companies and architectural workshops to give children a broader understanding of the topic.

The topics covered are outlined in our curriculum overview.

Below is information regarding the New National Curriculum for Design Technology and The Early Years Outcomes documents.

Early Years

Learning for Design and technology begins in the very first years at Portland.

 Design and Technology skills are broad and many are covered within the  Specific Area Expressive Arts and Design (EAD)

  • Be imaginative — initiated through drawing and music.

 · Handle tools and equipment safely.

  • Continue to develop fine motor skills with a variety of tools. (scissors and pencils).

 · Show good control and co-ordination in large and small scale movements.

• Beginning to be interested in and describe the texture of things.

• Uses various construction materials.

• Beginning to construct, stacking blocks vertically and horizontally,

• Joins construction pieces together to build and balance.

 • Realises tools can be used for a purpose. mix colours.

• Experiments to create different textures.

• Understands that different media can be combined to create new effects.

 • Manipulates materials to achieve a planned effect.

• Constructs with a purpose in mind, using a variety of resources.

 • Uses simple tools and techniques competently and appropriately.

• Selects appropriate resources and adapts work where necessary.

• Selects tools and techniques needed to shape, assemble and join materials they are using.

Purpose of study Key Stages 1 and 2

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

 Aims

The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

Attainment targets

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

Subject content Key stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment]. When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology Make § select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics Evaluate
  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria Technical knowledge
  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable
  • explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

 Key stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment]. When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

 Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world Technical knowledge
  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures
  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors]
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products

 Cooking and nutrition

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. Pupils should be taught to: Key stage 1

 · use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes

  • understand where food comes from.

 Key stage 2

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques
  •  understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.